I Fished the CRUD out of Hatbill

Last Saturday I decided to put in at Hatbill again for my first solo trip in the new (to me) canoe. I wanted to try a couple of new spots I had not visited by kayak before, primarily the big turns and the T Split upstream of Orange Mound. I have spent a fair amount of time in the section of river downstream of Orange Mound, and feeling relatively confident in running the boat with a buddy, I wanted to do some exploring by myself.

I arrived at Hatbill around 9:00am and was met with a 20-30mph wind… sigh. I quickly loaded up the canoe, and since I was running solo, filled two 30 liter dry bags with water and attached them with carabiners to the lacing at the bow of the boat, and stuffed all the rest of my gear forward as well. This ballast really did a good job of keeping the bow down, offsetting the weight from my big fat butt plus thirty additional pounds of outboard motor. I have a small stool I can use as a “jump seat” to move my weight more towards the center of the boat, but really only needed that in the shallowest of water.

I set off downstream and decided to make my way up to the T Split by way of the secondary Bear Bluff channel. I have never traveled via this channel and was quickly met with shallow water. The initial 1/4 of a mile is so shallow, it required me to pull up the outboard and hop out to pull the canoe with the painter line. Thankfully there was also no sign of alligators in the area, and after a brief walk and a short period of push poling the boat with the paddle, I was able to crank up the motor and make my way upstream.

Bear Bluff Shelter

I arrived at the Bear Bluff Shelter and as I was about to start fishing, I was joined by two airboats that pulled up to the shelter. I decided to yield the spot and head further upstream. While the pool in front of the shelter had decent current at the head and tail, I did not have high hopes for finding shad, figuring the shallow water in the secondary channel had already cut fish off from making their way upstream via this path.

After a short motor, I arrive at the T Split where I found fantastic current at the actual split, and the run upstream of it. I fished both the east and west egress spots of the split and picked up some panfish but no shad. I did work my way up the run a bit, but spotted a couple of gator heads about 50 yards from where I wanted to be, so I decided not to wade any further.

I made my way upstream to the next set of big turns where I found two very nice pools and a nice run between them. Unfortunately with the stiff wind, the current was backed up on the run, making swinging a fly futile. The first pool had a good amount of surface activity just out of comfortable wading reach. Unfortunately I had three very nice sized buddies hanging out closer than I would prefer to wade any further than about knee high. My gut told me there were fish there, but it was not worth a close encounter in the middle of nowhere.

The view from Orange Mound

At about 12:30 I decided to make the run down to Orange Mound and have some lunch. Along the way, an airboat came up behind me on a very narrow channel, so I pulled over in the shallows and let him pass. The channel was maybe 30 feet wide.

When I arrived at Orange Mound, there was one other airboat on the beach, and after a friendly greeting by them, I landed my boat well downstream to give them some space. While I had not needed my little “jump seat” for the most part, it made a perfect little place to sit up on the midden, and I enjoyed an ice cold beer, a sandwich and some cashews.

Shortly after finishing my lunch, the airboat took off, so I decided to fish the run and small pool in front of Orange Mound. Again I picked up a few panfish, and about the time I was about to give up and was reeling in line, I saw a swell of maybe 4 or five fish come the surface, one of which took the fly hard and made a fast run straight upstream and then jumped. Unfortunately I lost the fish when it jumped, but it was clearly a nice shad. The experience of multiple fish coming up to surface like that reminded me of fishing upstream of Snowhill Road, where I have seen multiple fish in the clear water peel off from the pod and chase down a fly. With aggressive feeding behavior like that, I expected to catch more fish, but unfortunately after working the area thoroughly at different depths and with different flies, never had another taker.

I made my way downstream towards First Junction by way of the west channel, which I found to be very shallow, even for my boat. Another foot lower on the gauge and I am not sure the outboard will even be worth the trouble around Hatbill. As I approached First Junction, I studied the water for any activity, and after 5-10 minutes of idling, decided to make my way down to the Second Junction by way of the east channel.

Just upstream of Second Junction

Upon arriving, I found the run just upsteam of the junction to be high and dry compared to my last visit. I have caught fish from this very spit of land that narrows the channel in to very fast moving current both at the head and tail of the run. I also like the deep pool just upstream of this spot. However today I found no takers on the run, and while I fished it, a skiff landed at the pool and fished there for around 20 minutes. I did not see them catch anything, so I decided not to bother.

I ran back down the east channel to First Junction where again, I fished the area very thoroughly at different depths with different flies and again found not joy and decided to call it a day near 5:00pm. In all, I covered around eight miles, fishing both new as well as familiar spots and all I can say is, it has been a difficult year. While I enjoyed exploring, and now feel completely comfortable running the new boat alone (which is a win,) I would say I am done with Hatbill for the year. The question is, where to next?

Shad Show-and-Tell Presentation

Philippe Richen from the Orlando Kayak Fishing Club (OKFC) Facebook Group was nice enough to invite me to be the guest speaker for their Facebook Live Fishing Seminar #3 on December 5, 2019. This is a High Definition recording of my presentation. Topics include:

1. Equipment
What types of rods, reels, and lines do you need to fish for shad?

2. Flies/ Lures
What types of flies and lures are effective for catching shad?

3. Tactics
How to find fish and what to do to catch them

4. Preparing for the Season
What I do to get ready for the shad season

5. Where will I fish this year???
The places I plan to visit to fish for shad this year

Partridge and Peacock

The Partridge and Peacock is a traditional soft hackle fly, that I have modified to meet my needs when fishing for shad on the Econlockhatchee River. During years when the Econ has high flow relative to the St. Johns River, the shad can make their way up the Econ in considerable numbers, and when the water levels are right, they can even make their way to the section of river above Snowhill Road, and beyond.

Don’t let the dark bottom of the pools deceive you, the water in this section of river can be very clear. You will also often find schools of shad sitting above white sandy bottom in very shallow water where you can sight fish for them. So swinging a big, flashy fly will inevitably spook them. In these conditions, longer leaders with finer tipits are required, and attached to that, a smaller fly that looks natural and buggy. Everything in the river eats a soft hackle, and the Partridge and Peacock is my go-to fly when the shad get spooky.

Partridge and Peacock:

Hook: Size 10 Nymph Hook
Thread: 8/0 Dark Brown Uni-Thread
Body: Ice Dub- UV Peacock Eye
Wing: Hungarian Partridge
Eyes: Black Bead Chain

First Shad of the Season Contest – 2018/ 2019

It’s that time of year again! Let’s get the 2018/ 2019 shad fishing season started, with this season’s First Shad of the Season Contest! The winner will receive a $50 Gift Card to Orlando Outfitters!

First Shad of the Season Contest 2018/2019 Rules:

  1. The contest begins December 6, 2018 and ends once I have confirmed a winner
  2. This is a catch, photograph and release contest
  3. To be eligible you must:
    • Be a member of the Shad on the Fly Facebook Group. Membership is free, but the Facebook group is a closed group so you must request to be added as a member
    • Download the Shad on the Fly 2018/ 2019 Official Token image above and print it out. You may trim it down to size. 
      Alternatively, you can save it to your cell phone and use your phone to display the token as long as it is CLEARLY visible (just don’t drop it in the water!)
  4. To win you must:
    • Catch a shad using a fly rod and fly
    • Be the first person to upload a picture of the fish, fly reel, and fly with the Official Token clearly visible in the image to the Shad on the Fly Facebook Group
  5. I will message the winner in Facebook to get their address and mail the prize, or setup a meetup on the water if possible. Whatever works best for the winner

 Official Facebook Stuff:

The Shad on the Fly- First Shad of the Season Contest is in no way sponsored, endorsed, administered by, or associated with Facebook. Participants understand that they are providing their information to the owner of the Shad on the Fly Facebook Group, and not to Facebook.           

Skunked at Hatbill

I probably should have heeded the old saying, when the wind blows from the north, don’t venture forth, as I got skunked at Hatbill yesterday. However, the high pressure made far too pretty of a day for me to stop myself, and I was on the water by about 9:30. I made my way up to the second junction, by way through Baxter Point this time.

Big gator, thankfully not the one I hit

This decision put me in a very narrow and shallow (maybe 15 feet wide and 6 inches deep) side channel as I weaved my way downstream. The side channel was so narrow, I would soon come to regret my choice of paths when I hugged the inside of a turn, only to find an alligator sunning itself in the shallows of the south bank as I came around a bend. With a 20-25mph North/ Northwest wind, and no brakes on the Hobie, before I could even start to back paddle, I HIT said alligator with the bow of my kayak! Thankfully I scared it more than it scared me, and it quite literally ran on water (just 6 inches deep) until it reached deeper water and slipped under. Ummmmm… yea, clean undies anyone!?

I arrived at the convergence of the East (or is it North?) and West (or is it South?) channels only to find the current completely backed up on the west channel. There was a fair amount of surface activity just upstream on the west channel, but I could not determine if it was just bass or panfish. With the north wind pushing the current upstream swinging flies was a futile effort, but I stripped kip tailed clousers and fry flies through the activity and found no takers.

I moved over to the north bank on the east channel and with the wind at my back was able to make cannon like casts with the switch rod. The narrow east channel is much faster anyway, and even with the stiff wind, there was plenty of current to swing flies. I worked the area very thoroughly, 10-15 steps at a time, making a short, medium, and long distance cast each time before moving, making one full pass with a bead chain fly and then decided to head back upstream to do it again with a 5/32 hourglass fly to make sure I thoroughly covered the water column.

The bull is in there somewhere

As I got back upstream to start the next pass, a head of cattle started running my way. Noticing I was basically standing on a cattle trail, I started yelling mooooo! and waiving my hands like an idiot to persuade them to find another path. As they approached, the cows stopped, but one of the bulls in the group did not! Now he was not in a full heads down charge like you see at a bullfight or anything, but he had that confident swagger that said to me I am a handsome boy, these are my girls, and YOU had better get out of my way! With seconds to make a decision, a narrow stream behind me, and a river (I had already had an alligator incident in) in front of me, I actually drew my gun! Thankfully as I disengaged the safety and brought the pistol up to get a sight picture, the bull stopped in its tracks, I kid you not… right about where you see the point near where I am standing on said cattle path in the picture. I’ll take a second order of clean undies for the day, and the check please!

The bull turned around and joined the group, and there they sat and stared at me as I worked my way downstream, fishing the heavier fly. When I reached my kayak, I saddled up and made my way upstream, finally yielding the spot back to the cattle. I fished the area just upstream where there is good current and depth and did not get a bite.

At around 2:00, I decided I had enough and started to make my way upstream. I opted NOT to take the same path back, and instead head towards the first junction. I fished it for maybe thirty minutes, before I had enough of the wind and the lockjaw. As I paddled back to the launch, and made my way through what I will forever call the gators-in-the-mist pool, I counted eight heads, still hanging there even in the afternoon.

I have to say, it has been an adventurous year out of Hatbill Park, and I think I am done with it… for this year! 🙂