Art of Eating The Lost Fishery – Art of Eating

Shad in California By Hank Shaw

Excerpt: Shad are everywhere in the rivers of the Pacific Coast and nowhere on the menu. Along the Sacramento River, which flows into the Sand Francisco Bay, it’s not uncommon to have a 50-fish day… READ MORE.

Source: Art of Eating The Lost Fishery – Art of Eating

California Shad Fly #11

This shad fly is part of The Pfeiffer Collection.

This is the eleventh, and final California shad fly in the collection originally found in the booklet How to Catch, Bone and Cook a Shad produced by the California Department of Fish and Game. This fly resembles the California Shad Fly #10, but is tied on a standard length hook, and the hackle is long and webby, or schlappen like. This creates a larger profile with a lot of action but, the length of the hackle also makes it more prone to fouling the hook in my experience. Be sure to check the fly after every few casts to make sure the barbs have not fouled the hook.

California Shad Fly #11

California Shad Fly #11 Pattern:

Hook: Size 4
Thread: Red Danville’s Flat Waxed Nylon
Tail: White Saddle Hackle Fibers
Body: Silver Oval Tinsel
Hackle: Palmered Webby Saddle Hackle
Eyes: Bead Chain

California Shad Fly #10

This shad fly is part of The Pfeiffer Collection.

This is the tenth of eleven California shad flies in the collection originally found in the booklet How to Catch, Bone and Cook a Shad produced by the California Department of Fish and Game. While this fly resembles other palmered hackle, oval tinsel body styled flies like the California Shad Fly #5, Russian River Shad Fly, the Shad Fly, and Hayden Shad Fly, the fact that it omits the chenille or yarn makes it an easier fly to tie and a winner in my book. I omit the use of embossed tinsel and rather wrap the body using common silver embroidery thread that can be found at fabric stores which makes it even easier to tie. Replace the bead chain eye with an hour glass eye, and tie it in either orange and white, or pink and white and you have a St. Johns River Favorite shad fly as well.

California Shad Fly #10

California Shad Fly #10 Pattern:

Hook: Size 4, 3x long
Thread: Red Danville’s Flat Waxed Nylon
Tail: Red Hackle Fibers
Body: Silver Embossed Tinsel (I chose silver embroidery thread)
Hackle: Palmered White Saddle Hackle
Eyes: Bead chain

California Shad Fly #9

This shad fly is part of The Pfeiffer Collection.

This is the ninth of eleven California shad flies in the collection originally found in the booklet How to Catch, Bone and Cook a Shad produced by the California Department of Fish and Game. I found this fly somewhat strange as the bead chain eyes looked to be tied on the bottom of the hook rather than on top of the hook where they would typically be tied to flip the hook so it rides hook tip up. I did try to tie a version with the bead chain on the top of the hook and flipped the throat and wing and it did not look bad, so you may want to give it a shot yourself if you are fishing slower, shallower water like the St. Johns River, where having a fly that rides hook tip up results in less snags. The original pattern calls for a white wing, but in this particular video I chose orange as I like to have some solid orange flies as well as white and orange.

California Shad Fly #9

California Shad Fly #9 Pattern:

Hook: Size 4
Thread: Orange Danville’s Flat Waxed Nylon
Eyes: Bead chain (tied on the bottom of the hook)
Tail: Orange Kip Tail
Body: Silver Oval Tinsel
Throat: Orange Hackle Fibers
Wing: White Kip Tail (I chose Orange)

California Shad Fly #8

This shad fly is part of The Pfeiffer Collection.

This is the eighth of eleven California shad flies in the collection originally found in the booklet How to Catch, Bone and Cook a Shad produced by the California Department of Fish and Game.

California Shad Fly #8

California Shad Fly #8 Pattern:

Hook: Size 4
Thread: Danville’s Red Flat Waxed Nylon
Tail: Yellow Kip Tail
Butt: Red Chenille
Body: Silver Oval Tinsel
Throat: Yellow Kip Tail
Collar: Red Chenille